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Search Results 0 to 41 of about 42 (some duplicates have been removed)
city government right now. over each of the years i have served, we have had to balance budget deficits that were around $500 million. this year, we're facing another budget deficit of almost $400 million. fortunately in recent years, we have had some ability to do some one-time budgeting tricks that allow us to balance the budget that do not exist this year. in past years, we've received federal stimulus money. we received more monies from the state government. last year our labor unions decided to contribute a quarter of a billion dollars to help balance last year's and this year's budget. those are things we do not have the ability to avail ourselves of us we balance the upcoming budget in a few months. we are faced with far fewer options. i think we are going to have to continue to look at very deep and difficult cuts. our priorities have to be insuring and protecting the most basic city services and helping to ensure that we have services to the most vulnerable during this great recession. >> what about the city's housing needs? what should the board due to address those needs? >>
the budget deficit, and real focus that we appreciate in northern california on clean energy. for example, moving the state's goal to be 33% clean energy producing. it is my privilege to welcome governor brown to the panel. [applause] >> and to introduce our next panelist, i would like to welcome steve ballmer, senior bp -- vp. >> good morning and thank you. next up is governor hickel lipper -- hickenlooper. he is the serieaal a entreprener each of you have in your respective parts. he became very successful in the brew pub business. he never had a single election not even for stink -- a student council. governor? [applause] in keeping with the discussion, he is keen on innovation and things of that nature. i know that will come out. thank you, governor. >> are we all set? i am from the "mercury news," and we're here because we live in a global cloueconomy. it has altered local economies because so many manufacturing and technology jobs are moving, whether it is a matter of costs for going where the trained work force is. we're fortunate to have to governors here to talk about how that ch
for a deficit deal, president obama pressed his case at the home of a middle class family in virginia today, part of his pitch to extend tax cuts for all but the very wealthy. good evening, i'm jeffrey brown. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the "newshour" tonight, we update the state of the negotiations and examine the push to make changes to social security and medicare. >> brown: then, margaret warner looks at the political strife in egypt, after deadly clashes in the streets and resignations by top officials. >> woodruff: we have a battleground dispatch from a coastal city facing rising sea levels and the next big storm. >> if sandy were to come close r directly into norfolk i think we'd all be in big trouble. >> brown: we assess the latest diplomatic moves to end syria's war, as secretary of state hillary clinton meets with russia's foreign minister. >> woodruff: and ray suarez has the story of a program that aims to put students at low-achieving schools on a path to high school graduation. >> we're here to make things better. we're here to tutor kids. we're here to make sure tha
. we have been talking about a snow deficit over the last several weeks. look at some of these departures ahead of the storm system. still very mild. in the 70s in little rock and the 50sin columbus ohio. behind it, much colder. >> maria, thanks. >>> coming up, our first look at the british nurse that is caught in a prank on the royal family. and prince william and kate devastated after that nurse is believed to have taken her own life. and now the not so funny prank backfiring on the pranksters. >> and the star of a wildly popular song hitting a sour note, now apologizing for comments he made about the united states just days before he is set to meet with president obama. and a new factor complicating efforts to reach a deal over the fiscal cliff. the president needs to make the next move. >> it is not going to help our economy, and it is not going to help those seeking work. i came out to put revenues on the table and to take a step toward the president to resolve this. when is he going take a step toward us? >>> welcome back and time for a quick check of the head lo
-war in washington, from one half of the team that produced the deficit-cutting plan republicans say is their inspiration, democrat erskine bowles. >> there are over $7 trillion worth of economic events that are going to hit america in the gut. i think impact would be really strong. if anybody thinks this is going to be a slope better wake up. >> ifill: the link between brain injury and sports, new evidence ties repeated blows to the head to long-term damage. we take a look. >> brown: ray suarez looks at the firestorm over israel's announcement it will expand settlements in the west bank. >> ifill: elizabeth brackett looks at how one chicago school is dealing with the transition to new state-wide standards. >> i really did find that the kids do understand more, and they learn more. they're more interested in what they're learning. >> brown: plus, as global carbon dioxide levels hit record highs, we analyze the increasing difficulty of combating climate change, with carol davenport of the "national journal." >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs n
of the entire group of government spending programs that are being looked at to get to deal with the deficits? >> well, before i answer that i was very interested in the way you characterized these programs as entitlements. so-called, you said, entitlements. and we think that a better term would be earned benefits. you know, i counted the letters in the word "entitlement." there are 11 letters. often people refer to entitlement as a four-letter word and it's a derogatory, derisive characterization. these are earned benefits. people pay for them while they're working, social security part "a" medicare, the hospital part. 25% of the premium for part "b." so i wish we would switch from entitlements to earned benefits, first of all. now answer your question, social security has not added a penny to the federal debt, to the deficits every year. it has a surplus. it has a surplus of $2.7 trillion. so why are we in such a rush to change a program that does not have -- is not bankrupt, has a surplus, has 22 years of solvency before it does have a serious problem and has not contributed to the federal
off this fiscal cliff, it doesn't make the deficit worse. it makes the deficit better. it would go a long way toward curing the deficit, but the deficit isn't the immediate problem for most people, the weak economy is. >> i agree. >> and if we dive off the fiscal cliff, the economy could get much weaker. that's -- >> by the way -- >> -- millions of americans. it's a problem for barack obama. >> just to back you up, i really think the great thing is the economy is just starting to lift up a. the unemployment rate is really starting to come down. we're getting good job production. thank you so much, ladies, for coming on tonight. thanks for the sharp thinking we got tonight. >>> up next, if you can't win by the rules, change then. that's what republicans are trying to do in pennsylvania. they don't like the lerer toal college because it didn't work for them. come back for the place for politics. derate alzheimer's, you'll also care about our new offer. you get access to nurses who can help with your questions. and your loved one can get exelon patch free for 30 days. if the doctor fe
on the highest 2%, you cannot generate enough revenue for deficit reduction. unfortunately, the changes in the tax code, which is republicans want to turn to will increase taxes and cut tax deductions for the middle class americans. >> all right. joining me now, contributing editor for the daily beast. we just heard from democratic senator there. does that sound like any progress has been made? as we talk about 23 days, that doesn't take into account we are looking at december 21st. if you happen to watch that on television, it looks like both sides are hardening. the cement is getting thicker. there's a growing recognition on the republican side that they have lost the debate over the higher tax rates and that those rates will go up. and there are lots of other tax increases that aren't getting the public attention. the rate at which capital gains are taxed. the rate that is paid on dividend income. i'm stumbling over my words because i don't have a lot in that category. i think the republicans are willing to move there and there's money there. the president has been more forthcoming o
low for middle-class families against the urgency of addressing our national budget deficits. by keeping tax rates low for 98% of americans and letting the tax rates go up very modestly for families earning over $250,000 a year, the democratic plan would cut the deficit by as much as a trillion dollars over the next decade. now, that alone doesn't cure our budget imbalance, but along with fair and sensible tax reforms and smart cuts in spending, it is part of the solution. let's be clear about one thing. the middle-class tax cut act would still benefit high-end taxpayers. families making over $250,000 a year would pay lower tax rates on their first $250,000. so if a family made $255,000, they'd only see an increase on the top $5,000 and then only to the clinton era rates that were in effect during the 1990's when, as we all recall, our economy was thriving. under the senate-passed plan, a family earning $255,000 a year would pay an extra 150 bucks in taxes. in opposing the middle-class tax cuts act, republicans claim that it would hurt the economy to raise tax rates on the to
deficit and debt. so this, this legislation both accomplishes that goal and still provides an increase in diversity which is what the senator from new york was talking about. and then an additional point is the point that the senator from texas so very clearly made. this legislation passed the house. last time i checked, legislation has to pass the senate and the house. that's a pretty important distinction. going back to the comments of the senator from kentucky. he said hey, if we can't do it all at once because of disagreements, let's start getting done what we can get done. so here is a bill that provides us with -- with people who can help our economy grow, people in the sciences and technology fields that we very much need. it will increase diversity just as the senator from new york said, and it's passed the house. common sense says let's go. let's pass the bill. so we very much want to join with the senator from new york and the senator from delaware and the other sponsors that he referred to, but let's join on something that can actually get done, meaning a bill that passes th
-author of a deficit reduction plan that neither side has previously embraced. i spoke with him a short time ago. erskine bowles, thank you so much for joining you. late this afternoon john boehner, the house speaker, sent a letter to the white house in which he said he needed to find different middle ground on this fiscal cliff issue. he particularly cited your report which he described as providing imperfect but fair middle ground as a way of breaking this political stalemate. he's saying only the president would adopt your approach that maybe this stalemate could be broken. what do you think about that? >> (laughing) well, i haven't seen the letter, as i think you know. it's nice that the speaker would give me some credit for trying to do that. but what he is referring to is when i testified before the super committee, i tried to show these guys that if they truly wanted to ghettoing that they could ghettoing at that time. and basically as an example on discretionary spending they were talking about cuts between $200-$400 billion. look, ghettoing on $300 billion. on health care between $500 b
has happened. a lot of things going on. our budget, we have a mess, i inherited a budget deficit of $26 billion. we have cut that substantially. from the mortgage meltdown that occurred because of the bad decisions and this behavior throughout our economy, the revenue in california is up 23%. that is a big number. america, the asset values were destroyed, something like $7 trillion. a lot of that was a bubble. that was popped and resulted -- we have had to manage a difficult situation. even before the bubble popping, there was excess. because the money flows in in a regular amounts, when money is good, everybody feels good. when $14 billion came in, they thought they were king of the mountain and spend it. arnold came in to clean it up. a couple years later, he left town and $26 billion this year. this has been the nature for the last decade, kicking the can down the road. not talking straight. the way it is. the way it is, it is a tale of two cities. there is fabulous wealth and link electronics, inc. model number: pdr-885 software version: 3.0c in some places it would be food o
at that. >> republicans frequently argue it is critical to get a handle on the nation's deficits before the u.s. becomes like greece. there a terrible economy with 26% unemployment, the highest in europe, and almost no job opportunities for young people frequently lead to riots in the streets. now here a leading democrat is suggesting cutting spending too quick -- too quickly is the real problem. >> the community is concerned about all of their as you teary too. there are many things you can do to reduce debt, but still have a a -- an aspect of the economy. >> some say europe's austerity is a drag on economic growth because it relies on taxation while failing to rein in the expansion of government. and that would seem to back up a republican theme in this fiscal cliff argument. >> if we raise taxes on the top two rates which is about a million small businesses who employ 25% of the workforce, it will cost us over 700,000 jobs and reduce economic growth and lower take home pay. that's a bad scenario. >> the lead negotiator on the republican side of the table facing mr. obama says raising
in a deficit talk is simple. it saves money. the keizer family foundation estimates that when it's all said and done, the government could save $5.7 billion in the first year of that plan. but those 65 and 66-year-olds they don't disappear. they are still going to be here and they are even going to get sick sometimes, which means the savings we'd see by kicking them off medicare rolls will pop back up in the economy. it's not pure savings, it's a cost shift. first and foremost, you're going to see increased costs for seniors who will have to find another health insurer since medicare is huge and uses its bargaining power to pay less by quite a bit. the seniors turning to private insurance will have to pay more for the same coverage. 3.7 billion more in the first year of the policy. for those 65 and 66 years old who are eligible for medicaid, states will have to pick up some of that tab. so three-quarters of a billion dollars will pick up that tab, we think. then there are the employers. many of the ineligible will turn to their employers. that will increase the health care costs of companie
much deficit reduction. too much spending cuts. when the private sector, when businesses and consumers are not spending, what we need is for government to be the spender of last resort. we don't want to go into major spending cuts. that's the austerity trap that europe has found itself in, and it would be crazy for us to go in that direction. >> before we go, very quickly, yes or no. do we have a deal by the end of the year? >> yes. >> and what about you, doug? >> marginally, yes. 60/40 in favor of a deal but they've got to get moving. >> we'll have to see if it's a real deal or another kick of the can down the road or some other interim thing. thanks for being here. >>> "outfront" next, the u.s. military draws up new plans for a potential strike against syria as we learn more about that country's stockpile of chemical weapons. >>> plus -- the u.s. supreme court agrees to take on the issue of gay marriage. and is that a signal, is that a signal that for republicans, it may be time to reconsider its view on this? >>> and a nurse duped by a prank call leaking information about the duches
in vegas if the politicians in washington negotiate a bad deal on the budget and deficit, what do you think will happen to medicare and medicaid benefits? and to our coverage? cutting hundreds of billions of dollars from medicare and medicaid will short change the people who need it the most. so if you don't want seniors to come up empty. call sen. warner and tell him don't make a bad deal that cuts our care. brand new learning center opening in our region. you're watching "news 4 today." >>> good morning. if you're just joining us, in a few days the brand new national children's museum will open doors to public and prince george's county. joining to us talk about the work to open this building is jay willard witson, the museum's president. thank you for joining us. >> thank you. >> this is more than just a big open playground for kids. you're hoping to spark some fire under these kids and inspire them. >> our mission is to inspire children to care about and improve the world. while that's a serious mission, the way we execute that and engage audiences through play. we're dedicated to the f
on the budget and deficit, what do you think will happen to medicare and medicaid benefits? and to our coverage? cutting hundreds of billions of dollars from medicare and medicaid will short change the people who need it the most. so if you don't want seniors to come up empty. call sen. warner and tell him don't make a bad deal that cuts our care. . >>> today an annual tradition honoring those who served. more than 400,000 wreaths are on their way to locations nationwide as part of the wreaths across america campaign. 100,000 are headed to arlington national cemetery. it started 20 years ago when a wreath company in maine had around 5,000 extra wreaths it couldn't sell. the owner decided to ship them to arlington and it's grown into a nationwide event. >> it's such a gorgeous sight. one of the first places i took my family members when they came to visit because it was beautiful to see. >> unfortunately, it won't be a pretty day to go outside and sort of enjoy all the festivities of the holiday season. cloudy skies have been a big part of our weekend. and rain chances are on the up and up. if y
at home in prince george's county, but also in annapolis. >> crime is down. he closed two budget deficits, and now has hopes for the fbi to follow. he says its focus has been on making the county more business friendly. >> those who especially thought that there was a pay-for-play here, and that they didn't want to do business here, i wanted to have something that would say to them, you know what, maybe we should take a chance on prince george's county. >> the county executive says for the rest of his term, his first priority, education, and improving the prince george's county school system. he says he knows for sure that he's running for a second term. in prince george's county, tracee wilkins, news4. >>> the brother of former d.c. council chairman kwame brown has been charged with bank fraud, the same charge that led kwame brown to resign his council seat earlier this year. according to the charging documents, che brown made false claims about his income on a mortgage loan application back in 2010. his lawyer says brown plans to plead guilty. che brown also pleaded guilty to a similar
are the points in time when you're able to deal with some of the deficit issues -- and by the way, government is only funded through march, anyway. so regardless of the debt ceiling, there's still the issue of the fact that we have-- we have only funded government through march. there are two points, the funding of government and the debt ceiling and i would agree with you, that it's unfortunate that a 11 reg point like that has to be used. we should sit down to solve the problem. but the it's the only thing thus far that produced results -- we got the budget control act last time-- to really take our nation towards solvency. i would agree with you. i wish we could sit down and self-solve it. i think there is a majority in the hous house and senate that t to do that, but the only two negotiators that matter right now are the president and speaker boehner. and as i mentioned before-- again, i understand there are two sides of this tale-- the president is really not yet offering the kind of reforms that would make these programs solvent for the long haul so we're trying to think how do we get t
deficits for as far as the eye can see. washington has a spending problem. not a receive knew problem. the president doesn't agree with our proposal, i believe that he's got an obligation to families and small businesses to offer a plan of his own. a plan that can pass both chambers of the congress. we are ready and eager to talk to the president about such a plan. >> mr. speaker, you did speak with the president earlier this week. can you characterize that call? did he have any kind of counteroffer? also, we understand that he just is making clear that it is -- got to be increase in rates for the wealthy or no deal. are you willing to give a little bit, maybe just not all the way to 39.6? >> it was the -- the phone call was pleasant. but it was just more of the same. the conversations -- the staff had yesterday just more of the same. it is time for the -- president, if he is serious to come back to us with a counteroffer. >> mr. speaker, the jobs report indicated unemployment is down roughly a palm point from this time last year. lot of folks in business communities say no deal is go
the clock. let's do it. the argument for cutting 65 and 67-year-olds out of a deficit talk is simple. it saves money. the keizer family foundation estimates that when it's all said and done, the government could save $5.7 billion. but those 65 and 66-year-olds don't disappear. they are still going to be here and get sick sometimes which means the savings we'd see by kicking them off they pop back up elsewhere in the economy. it's not pure savings, it's a cost shift. you're going to see increased costs for seniors who will have to find another health insurer since it uses power to pay less by quite a bit. the seniors turning to private insurance will have to pay more from the same coverage. 3.7 billion more in the first year of the policy. for those who are eligible for medicaid, will move to the states, we think. then there are the employers. many of the ineligible will turn to their employers. that will increase the health care costs of companies by $5.4 billion. some of the seniors will turn to the affordable care act in the insurance exchanges. those left in medicare will pay a hi
cuts if congress fails to compromise on a deficit-reducing agreement by year's end. >> we need stability. we want a strong national defense for this country, i need to have some stability, and that's what i'm asking the congress to do, give me some stability with regards to the funding of the defense department for the future. >> the biggest effect caused by all of the government indecision, the inability to pass a budget, the looming sequestration is uncertainty. >> reporter: his small company of 40 employees manufacturers drones, mounts it with cameras for the military and first responders. >> what do we do? do we contract the business? do we try to hold the business constant? do we try to diversify into other market segments? every small business in the country is asking those fundamental questions. >> want to see it? >> part of the reason i was brought in there was to diversify the type of work that they do. they want to look more on the commercial side as well. >> reporter: despite confidence with their jobs, the unknown is nerve racking. >> with christmas coming up and so
should be because part of the deficit problem, a great part, is entitlements, social security and medicare, keep adding fiscal burdens as people's live expectancy increases and it's great that people are living longer but when social security was first thought of the life expectancy was only 67. now it is around 85. we need to raise retirement ages or somehow thinking about cutting back on benefits to keep the programs in balance. ashley: diana, the other side of this issue is coming down to taxes. two years ago the president said he didn't want to let taxes go up because gdp growth was so low. how can you make that argument two years later today. gdp still struggling to get any traction? >> he should be making that argument because gdp growth is now at 2%. it was at 2.5 when he made the argument in 2010. there was even more reason not to get tax rates higher, not to allow them to go higher. the only way we'll get out of this fiscal mess is through more economic growth. and if we raise tax rates that is going to stifle economic growth. we need to be keeping tax rates the same
Search Results 0 to 41 of about 42 (some duplicates have been removed)